joewebs:

Hanoi

It wasn’t spam, a German magazine emailed me and paid me €250 to print this photograph, therefore making it the best haircut ever.  

joewebs:

Hanoi

It wasn’t spam, a German magazine emailed me and paid me 250 to print this photograph, therefore making it the best haircut ever.  

(Source: spellsofmagic.com)

prettypuke:

_ *PP .:. T A LK •

"fuck you generation"

prettypuke:

_ *PP .:. T A LK •

"fuck you generation"

14 year old tumblr girls give the best .Gif tutorials, thanks MsWeakass!

14 year old tumblr girls give the best .Gif tutorials, thanks MsWeakass!

(Source: donlonbooks.com)

DOGFIGHT, River Phoenix, Lili Taylor, 1991, (c) Warner Brothers

Jenny Holzer

WITH YOU INSIDE ME COMES THE KNOWLEDGE OF MY DEATH

Brian Dillon

Objects in This Mirror“Like Roland Barthes and Virginia Woolf, Brian Dillon pays lavish attention to curious byways that usually go without saying. In sentences at once playful and majestic, he plumbs the intellectual depths of his subjects, and reveals a perverse, nearly dandyish love for odd facts and iconoclastic vistas. There is more than a touch of W. G. Sebald—the Wordsworthian wanderer, the romantic itinerant—in Dillon’s melancholy yet mood-spiked attitude toward the material objects that greet his sober, ever-evaluating eye.  Reading Objects in This Mirror, we participate in Dillon’s restless perambulations, and we are delighted to be thus transported.”—Wayne Koestenbaum

Brian Dillon

Objects in This Mirror

“Like Roland Barthes and Virginia Woolf, Brian Dillon pays lavish attention to curious byways that usually go without saying. In sentences at once playful and majestic, he plumbs the intellectual depths of his subjects, and reveals a perverse, nearly dandyish love for odd facts and iconoclastic vistas. There is more than a touch of W. G. Sebald—the Wordsworthian wanderer, the romantic itinerant—in Dillon’s melancholy yet mood-spiked attitude toward the material objects that greet his sober, ever-evaluating eye.  Reading Objects in This Mirror, we participate in Dillon’s restless perambulations, and we are delighted to be thus transported.”
—Wayne Koestenbaum

Delete looks at the surprising phenomenon of perfect remembering in the digital age, and reveals why we must reintroduce our capacity to forget. Digital technology empowers us as never before, yet it has unforeseen consequences as well. 
In Delete, Viktor Mayer-Schönberger traces the important role that forgetting has played throughout human history, from the ability to make sound decisions unencumbered by the past to the possibility of second chances. The written word made it possible for humans to remember across generations and time, yet now digital technology and global networks are overriding our natural ability to forget—the past is ever present, ready to be called up at the click of a mouse. Mayer-Schönberger examines the technology that’s facilitating the end of forgetting—digitization, cheap storage and easy retrieval, global access, and increasingly powerful software—and describes the dangers of everlasting digital memory, whether it’s outdated information taken out of context or compromising photos the Web won’t let us forget. He explains why information privacy rights and other fixes can’t help us, and proposes an ingeniously simple solution—expiration dates on information—that may.

Delete is an eye-opening book that will help us remember how to forget in the digital age.
Why we must remember to delete – and forget – in the digital age

theguardian.com

Delete looks at the surprising phenomenon of perfect remembering in the digital age, and reveals why we must reintroduce our capacity to forget. Digital technology empowers us as never before, yet it has unforeseen consequences as well. 

In Delete, Viktor Mayer-Schönberger traces the important role that forgetting has played throughout human history, from the ability to make sound decisions unencumbered by the past to the possibility of second chances. The written word made it possible for humans to remember across generations and time, yet now digital technology and global networks are overriding our natural ability to forget—the past is ever present, ready to be called up at the click of a mouse. Mayer-Schönberger examines the technology that’s facilitating the end of forgetting—digitization, cheap storage and easy retrieval, global access, and increasingly powerful software—and describes the dangers of everlasting digital memory, whether it’s outdated information taken out of context or compromising photos the Web won’t let us forget. He explains why information privacy rights and other fixes can’t help us, and proposes an ingeniously simple solution—expiration dates on information—that may.

Delete is an eye-opening book that will help us remember how to forget in the digital age.

Why we must remember to delete – and forget – in the digital age

theguardian.com

stazia:

drbgood:
Sister Rosetta Tharpe in Manchester, 1964.

stazia:

drbgood:

Sister Rosetta Tharpe in Manchester, 1964.